Action Alert: Ask Representatives to Stop Medicaid Cuts

Take-Action-2-300x212

Action Alert: Proposed Changes to Medicaid Will Cut Funding

Call Your Representatives Today!

 

Congress is moving quickly to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA or Obamacare) and replace it with the American Health Care Act, or AHCA. This bill will make drastic cuts to the Medicaid program affecting people with autism who are currently getting Medicaid, including those on Innovations home and community based waiver, those on the waiting list, and those who may need these services in the future.

The health-care bill is being debated now. The House of Representatives is moving quickly to push for a vote by the end of March. The Senate is planning to vote on the House bill before the mid-April recess.

We urgently need you to call your senators and representatives today and explain why the ACA and Medicaid are essential to people with disabilities and their families. People’s health, services, and lives are at stake.

Message: Do not cut and cap Medicaid. As it is currently written, the AHCA will cut an estimated $800 billion from Medicaid over the next 10 years.

  • Already lengthy waiting lists for disability waiver services will grow to record levels, and services may be severely limited. General Assembly legislators are moving to reduce NC waiting lists; these changes at the federal level could stop this from happening
  • If funds become scarcer, states may decide to stop providing personal care, mental health, prescription drugs, and rehabilitative services.
  • People with disabilities who require Medicaid services to live in their own homes, hold jobs, and participate in communities may be without those supports. Costs could shift to individuals or family members.
  • Coverage for intensive behavior services (including ABA) for children under Medicaid’s EPSDT could end.
  • Schools may no longer be reimbursed for services. This would only increase the burden on schools.
  • For additional information, see the Medicaid fact sheet developed by the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities.

Take 5 minutes to call your representatives now!

Let them know:

  • I am your constituent.
  • I am a person with a disability, or I am a family member of someone with a disability, or I am a professional in the disability field.
  • I care deeply about health care, including Medicaid.
  • Briefly share your personal story; that is what will make a difference.
  • North Carolina is already using per-capita funding models and has 8-year waiting lists for many autism services.
  • Do not allow per-capita caps and cuts to Medicaid to be part of an ACA replacement.

Call now:

Sen. Richard Burr 202-224-3154

Sen. Thom Tillis 202-224-6342

NC congressional delegation (find which US House member represents you here):

  • 1st District: George “G.K.” Butterfield Jr. 202-225-3101
  • 2nd District: George Holding 202-225-3032
  • 3rd District: Walter Jones Jr. 202-225-3415
  • 4th District: David Price 202-225-1784
  • 5th District: Virginia Foxx 202-225-2071
  • 6th District: Mark Walker 202-225-3065
  • 7th District: David Rouzer 202-225-2731
  • 8th District: Richard Hudson 202-225-3715
  • 9th District: Robert Pittenger 202-225-1976
  • 10th District: Patrick McHenry 202-225-2576
  • 11th District: Mark Meadows 202-225-6401
  • 12th District: Alma Adams 202-225-1510
  • 13th District: Tedd Budd 202-225-4531

 

To learn more about how to advocate with your legislators, see our website.

Every call you make counts! Literally. Staff and representatives are noting the issues and counting calls.

Thank you for taking action and making calls today!

 

ASNC Day on the Hill

 

capitol-hill

This article was contributed by Jennifer Mahan, Director of Advocacy and Public Policy.

The Autism Society of North Carolina traveled to Washington, D.C., to participate in the Autism Society of America’s annual Day on the Hill for Autism Society advocates. Our goal in participating this year was to make sure that we voiced to Congress the critical need for services and supports for people of all ages on the autism spectrum, as legislators consider affordable health care access, Medicaid funding, and education issues.

ASNC Director of Policy Jennifer Mahan met with staff from our congressional delegation on Capitol Hill February 16 to discuss our concerns about affordable, comprehensive health care; Medicaid’s importance to people with disabling conditions; the need for adult services including employment supports and housing; and the right to a free appropriate education that meets the needs of students with disabilities.

Many of our current members of Congress are aware of autism issues, as well as the work of ASNC, based on their connections to constituents, families and ASNC’s long history of service in NC. Despite this familiarity, with so many changes happening on a national level it is more important than ever for all of us to make the connection between the policy decisions faced by our members of Congress and the impact of those decisions on the lives of people with autism and their families.

 

What You Can Do

  1. Learn who represents you and North Carolina in Congress.
    • You are represented by two US senators, Richard Burr and Thom Tillis.
    • You are represented by one member of the US House of Representatives, based on where you live. You can find out which US House member represents you by entering your street address on the THIRD map at the bottom of this page. (Please note that only the third map on this page is for Congress. The other maps are for the NC General Assembly.) Or you can call the Congressional Switchboard at 202-224-312 for info on your members of Congress.
  2. Tell your representatives about your experiences with autism, as a person on the spectrum, as a family member, as a professional, as someone who cares:
    • Call or email. Handwritten letters take weeks or months to reach Congress because of security measures. Calling or emailing is better. Better still is inviting your member of Congress to a local autism event or local service organization to see things firsthand.
    • Say you live in their district. (OR for your two senators, say that you live in NC).
    • Tell them the basics: who you are, how autism has affected you, why the issue is important, and why retaining or getting access to health care and education services has helped. Keep it to the equivalent of a page or a five-minute conversation. Short summaries are more likely to generate questions and interest in your issue.
    • Be respectful and positive, but firm. Ask for what you need. Some talking points are below. See our toolkit Advocacy 101 for more on working with elected officials.

 

Talking Points to Advocate on Issues that Matter

We know that health and disability issues can be complex. Below are some points that you can use in your discussions with Congress. MOST IMPORTANT is telling your story about autism and what is working or what could be improved with the help of your member of Congress. You don’t need to be a policy expert!

  1. The Affordable Care Act/“Obamacare”
    • The ACA should not be repealed without a plan for replacement that maintains or improves access to health care.
    • People with autism have benefited from parts of the ACA that require coverage for pre-existing conditions, the ability to stay on families’ health-care insurance until the age of 26, and the ability to buy affordable coverage on the health marketplace.
    • Autism is a complex disorder that often includes other physical and neurological conditions.
    • Any health-care package must include both rehabilitative AND habilitative services, mental health and addiction services coverage, behavior treatment, and prescription drug coverage.
    • Because of changes in the ACA, North Carolina has dramatically improved access to children’s health care, which improves access to developmental screening, early identification of autism, and early interventions.
    • Health care must be affordable and address high cost-sharing requirements and high premiums. Many families already struggle with added costs of raising a child with special health needs. Many adults on the spectrum are unemployed or under-employed, so age cannot be the only factor in determining health-care subsidies.
  2. Medicaid
    • Medicaid provides health-care services, long-term care services, and other supports that maintain health, functioning independence, safety and well-being to an estimated 500,000 children and adults with disabilities in North Carolina.
    • State Medicaid programs provide critical screening, early intervention, and home-based health programs for children with autism under Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT). Early screening, diagnosis, and intervention are critical to preventing long-term disability.
    • NC is already doing a good job with its federal Medicaid funds: NC has used managed-care principles, prevention services, and health data to effectively manage Medicaid costs.
    • Do not cut Medicaid funding. Program cuts, along with block granting or per capita caps would hurt people with autism who rely on Medicaid for essential services. These costs get passed along to beneficiaries, families, and providers who are already doing more with less.
    • Additional cuts or restrictions on Medicaid funding could prevent NC from addressing the 12,000 people with developmental disabilities, including autism, on NC’s Medicaid waiver waiting list.
  3. Education
    • The Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) and the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) ensure that students with disabilities get the education they need and that schools are subject to a strong accountability system to ensure all students succeed.
    • IDEA is parent-driven: parents ask for evaluations, participate in planning, and can access procedural protections to ensure that their child is able to learn.
    • The federal IDEA act is not perfect, but it is assuring families that their child is able to attend school and get access to the curriculum in the least restrictive environment. It is CRITICALLY important to assure these rights for students with disabilities.
    • Schools are already challenged to meet the needs of students with disabilities: right now only about 15% of the funding for educating special needs students comes from the federal government though much more was promised. Please fully fund special education.

 

If you have questions about policy issues, please contact Jennifer Mahan, ASNC Director of Advocacy and Public Policy, at jmahan@autismsociety-nc.org or 919-865-5068.

 

 

 

2016 Legislative Wrap-Up: Other Highlights

5837733877_6b2b4c2223_z

This article was contributed by Jennifer Mahan, Director of Advocacy and Public Policy at ASNC. It is the third of three parts wrapping up the NC General Assembly’s 2016 short session.

IDD Caucus: Establishment of a bipartisan, bicameral IDD caucus: North Carolina is the fourth state in the United States to have an officially established intellectual and/or developmental disability caucus in both the NC House and the NC Senate. A caucus is a legislative group that comes together to focus efforts on a particular issue, in this case, to research, better understand, and advocate for legislation to address the needs of people with IDD. The IDD caucus is bi-partisan, includes both House and Senate members, and has just begun to get organized and start its work; ASNC is excited by this legislative interest in IDD issues, including autism, and we look forward to working with the members in the sessions to come.

Free DMV identification for people with IDD, HB 1033: ID Card Fee Waiver/Disability passed the House and Senate and allows individuals with an intellectual and/or developmental disability to obtain free non-driver’s identification from the NC Department of Motor Vehicles beginning October 1. Individuals must present a letter from their physician stating that they have a developmental disability to obtain free identification. This ID can be used as an approved document for Voter ID requirements. (Note that under recent voter identification laws, individuals may obtain non-driver’s identification for free if they state it is “for purposes of voting.” These voter identification laws are currently under review by the courts and may or may not remain in place. The new law for free, non-driver identification cards for people with DD would remain in place regardless of what happens with voter identification laws.)

Enact Uniform Law on Adult Guardianship, H817: This law enacted in 41 other states will clarify issues around interstate jurisdiction, mobility, and transferability of guardianship and interstate recognition of guardianship orders. The bill was worked on by guardianship and advocacy organizations, and was passed and signed into law.

Military families stay on Innovations waitlist, HB 842: Establishes a virtual wait list for families in the military waiting for waiver slots. Allows families to remain on the waiver wait list when relocated outside of North Carolina for military service, as long as the family retains its North Carolina legal residence and intends to return upon completion of the military service.

Medicaid Transformation changes: North Carolina has already passed legislation that will, over the next 5-7 years, move our Medicaid system to a managed care model offering both statewide private managed care as well as regional health system managed care options. The goal is to improve health outcomes and integrate physical and behavioral health care, while controlling costs. This year, clarifying changes were made to that bill based on the 1115 demonstration waiver submitted by North Carolina to the federal government that will:

  • Remove the “Department of Health Benefits” as the single state entity in charge of Medicaid and return authority to the Department of Health and Human Services, as required by the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).
  • Make several key adjustments around who and what will be covered in the capitated (managed care) system and require NC DHHS to submit reports on the progress of the waiver to the Joint Legislative Oversight Committee on Medicaid and NC Health Choice. New groups and programs exempted from the 1115 managed care demonstration waiver include:
    • PACE
    • School services provided under an IEP, including audiology, speech therapy, physical therapy, nursing, and psychological services, performed by schools or individual contracted with LEA.
    • Children’s Developmental Services Agencies
    • Presumptive Medicaid eligible people

 

If you have questions about North Carolina policy issues, please contact Jennifer Mahan, ASNC Director of Advocacy and Public Policy at jmahan@autismsociety-nc.org or 919-865-5068.

2016 Legislative Wrap-Up: The Budget

GA Front

This article was contributed by Jennifer Mahan, Director of Advocacy and Public Policy at ASNC. It is the first of three parts wrapping up the NC General Assembly’s 2016 short session.

The NC House and Senate agreed on a budget adjustments bill for the second year of the state’s two-year budget, which allocates a total of $22.34 billion across state services including education and health and human services. The 2016 budget adjustments spend less than 3% over what the 2015-2016 budget provided and only adjust the second year of the biennial budget. The budget includes funds for the state’s rainy day account, teacher and state employee raises, additional K-12 students with disabilities scholarships, and 250 additional Innovations home and community waiver slots, while reducing the base budget for Medicaid to reflect lower projected costs for healthcare services. Changes to tax revenue were addressed in a separate bill, which broadens the sales tax base and lowers individual income taxes by increasing the standard deduction from $1,000 to $2,000 through next year.

The $152 million planned cut to single-stream funding for mental health, developmental disabilities, and substance abuse services (MH/DD/SA) remains in the budget. Last year, $120 million was removed with a provision to restore $30 million if targets were met by the end of the 2015-16 fiscal year in June. Those targets were met, and the $30 million restored. The same budget provision remains in place for this year: if targets are met, $30 million will be restored at the end of 2016-17. However, the overall cut remains at an additional $152 million from LME/MCO reserves, typically used for services to people without other health-care options.

There are a few special provisions that target issues for the intellectual and/or developmental disability (I/DD) community including a comprehensive look at federal and state changes to the I/DD system, a strategic plan to address behavioral health in NC that looks at gaps in the LME/MCO system, and a study on the rates paid for certain types of services. As we look toward the 2017 budget process, single-stream dollars will have a significant deficit that could affect direct services across the state. Overall, the health and human services budget attempts to address key priorities from the General Assembly and the governor with small expansions to crisis funding, waivers, and disability scholarships and the preservation of existing autism services in Medicaid and through the nonprofit funding sections, but no large-scale expansion of services or special education funding.

The full budget bill with special provisions and conference reports listing specific dollar amount changes can be viewed at www.ncleg.net; links to budget documents are in the left column. The overall budget includes technical corrections made in House Bill 805 that may not be included in the ratified version of the budget until after it is signed into law. In the sections below where “recurring funds” are mentioned with an R, this means that the program will be funded in an ongoing way (at least for the next year and hopefully into future years) and “non-recurring” noted with an NR indicates that funds are one-time and only for the 2016-17 fiscal year.

 

Health and Human Services Budget

Innovations waiver slots: The final budget includes $2.6 million (R) for 250 Innovations home and community-based waiver slots (formerly CAP-IDD) to begin opening January 1 2017, which were included in the governor’s budget proposal. Innovations 1915 (c) waivers provide services to people who qualify for institutional level care because of intellectual or developmental disabilities, but can be served under a community-based program in their homes.

Replacement of LME/MCO single-stream funds: $30 million will be restored to single-stream funding which is used for MH/DD/SA services and individuals that are not eligible for Medicaid. An additional $30 million will be made available if there is a surplus in the Medicaid budget. This is well short of the $120 million and $152 million removed in budgets last year and this year.

Governor’s Task Force recommendations: The budget reserves $10 million (R) and $10 million (NR), to implement the recommendations of the Governor’s Task Force on Mental Health and Substance Use. The funds shall be held in the Mental Health and Substance Use Task Force Reserve Fund, will not revert, and shall remain available until expended. The task force recommendations include increasing access to child crisis services.

Dix property and crisis beds: The budget includes provisions for the sale of the Dorothea Dix Hospital property: $18 million and $2 million in funds will go toward increasing access to behavioral health care hospital beds and crisis centers for children and adolescents.

Medicaid rebase: This removes $350 million (R), 7.8%, from the Medicaid budget based on lower than projected costs for health care and the number of people eligible for Medicaid. These funds were moved into the general fund to support other budget increases.

 

Special provisions of note

The state budget includes policy provisions directing how funds are to be used and often include requirements to look at how departments or programs are operating, including the fiscal impact of making changes to them. A number of provisions could have effects on intellectual and/or developmental disability services.

IDD Study/Study Innovations Waiver: In the budget, the General Assembly’s Joint Legislative Oversight Committee on Medicaid and NC Health Choice is directed to study issues related to the delivery of services for people with I/DD, including causes and solutions for the growing wait list for Innovations home and community-based waiver slots. Potential solutions to address the wait list that are mentioned in the study are funding increases, creating “supports” waiver slots, and utilizing 1915(i) waiver options. The study is also expected to take a look at issues surrounding single-stream funding (state funds for non-Medicaid services), the impact of federal mandates on supports and services, and the coverage of services for autism including any state plan amendments needed to address guidance from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that directs states to offer autism behavioral services such as Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) or other treatments.

Rate study for residential services: This would study the “adequacy” of rates paid to providers for residential services, including supportive services such as respite, room and board, Special Assistance, transportation, and state-funded supports.

LME/MCO gap analysis and strategic plan: Section 12F.10.(B) of the budget special provisions requires the NC Department of Health and Human Services to develop a strategic statewide plan to “improve the efficiency and effectiveness of state funded behavioral health services,” including IDD services. Included in this plan are a determination of the state agency responsible for state-funded behavioral health, defining current and future roles of the LME/MCOs; a process for including measurable outcomes in contracts with providers and managed care organizations; a statewide needs assessment for MH, IDD, SUD, and TBI, looking at a continuum of care across services and counties; “solvency standards” for fiscal management of LME/MCOs; and anything else needed for the report. The plan and report to the General Assembly is due January 1, 2018.

Study of Medicaid coverage for school-based health: The General Assembly has asked NC DHHS to identify all school-based health services that are eligible for federal matching funds through Medicaid and report on the fiscal impact of adding Medicaid coverage for these school-based services not currently offered in NC.

Report on the progress of ABLE program trust: The Department of the State Treasurer is required to report to the General Assembly by December 1 on the status of the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Trust program that would allow people with disabilities and their families to open 529 savings plans.

If you have questions about the North Carolina state budget or other policy issues, please contact Jennifer Mahan, ASNC Director of Advocacy and Public Policy at jmahan@autismsociety-nc.org or 919-865-5068.

Speak Out on NC Budget Proposals

gavel31

This article was contributed by Jennifer Mahan, Director of Advocacy and Public Policy at ASNC.

On June 1, the NC Senate released its version of the budget adjustments bill for this year. Despite advocacy directed at the Senate to improve on what the NC House budget offered, the Senate includes no funding for federally required autism behavioral services (EPSDT), child or adult IDD crisis funding, pilot programs for targeted case management, or other autism services. The Senate instead reduces funds to the Medicaid base budget by 8%, rather than investing in needed autism services. The Senate included only $30 million in replacement funds for state-funded services to the Local Management Entities/Managed Care Organizations (LME/MCOs), and that funding is contingent on there being savings elsewhere in the budget to support it. The total loss of funds to LME/MCOs over two years is close to $275 million. In addition, the Senate does not include enough funding to take hundreds of families off of the waiting list for the K-12 students with disabilities scholarship.

Senate and House budget committee members are now starting the conference committee process, in which they will come to agreement on the differences between the two versions of the budget. There is still time to push for conference committee members to take the House budget numbers, which do not include everything we have asked for, but are better for people on the autism spectrum. To view the Senate and previous House budgets go to the General Assembly website.

Why are the Senate budget numbers a problem for children and adults with autism?

  • North Carolina has 12,000 people waiting for Innovations waiver services
  • While they wait, sometimes going into repeated crises, the only services they may qualify for are state-funded through the LME/MCO or in some cases, Medicaid EPSDT autism services. State-funded services administered by the LME/MCOs fund things such as crisis care, respite services, day services, residential care, and social and recreational programs. These programs build skills, provide safety and support, and give families a needed break.
  • During a crisis, they wait in emergency departments for scarce beds in programs that have the capacity to help them.
  • And during all this, they no longer have case management to assist them with system navigation, finding resources, and helping families advocate for better care.
  • Hundreds of children are waiting for K-12 scholarships even though legislators have said they are committed to offering a variety of educational options for students with disabilities who may not be able to be served in the public school system.

What can you do?

The needs of children and adults with autism are many, but there are solutions. North Carolina has the revenue to start making targeted investments in serving those who need services and educational options. Please call or write the NC senators below and ask them to start doing so now.

1) Autism Services: Contact the NC Senators listed below to ask for funding in the Health and Human Services budget for people with autism including Innovations waiver slots, crisis services for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and funding for needed autism services in Medicaid.

The message is simple: Too many people with autism are waiting years for help. NC needs to fund Innovations waiver slots, crisis services, and autism services in Medicaid, and return funding to LME/MCOs for people who have no other access to services.

If you have a family member on the autism spectrum, are waiting for help, and/or have been helped by services in some way, share your story.

  • Ralph Hise, Co-Chair Health and Human Services Appropriations, 919-733-3460, Ralph.Hise@ncleg.net
  • Louis Pate, Co-Chair Health and Human Services Appropriations, Deputy President Pro Tem, 919-733-562, Loiuis.Pate@ncleg.net
  • Tommy Tucker, Co-Chair Health and Human Services Appropriations, 919-733-7659, Tommy.Tucker@ncleg.net

 

2) K-12 Scholarships for Students with Disabilities: Contact the NC senators listed below to ask for funding to remove the waiting list for K-12 scholarships for students with disabilities in non-public schools.

The message: Ask the senator(s) to support the House’s budget, which puts $5.8 million in the budget for children and families on the waiting list for K-12 students with disabilities scholarships.

If you are on the waiting list or your family has found success in using the scholarship, please share your story.

 

3) Support the House budget for HHS and Education: Call the following NC House “Big” Appropriations Chairs/Members and tell them to support the House budget numbers during the budget conference committee process.

The message is simple: Use the House position on funding for Medicaid services, LME/MCO funding, crisis services, and the scholarship for students with disabilities.

 

If you have questions about the North Carolina state budget or other policy issues, please contact Jennifer Mahan, ASNC Director of Advocacy and Public Policy at jmahan@autismsociety-nc.org or 919-865-5068.

Have Your Say on Medicaid Reform in NC

North Carolina is undertaking plans to move forward with Medicaid Reform in our state. Last session, the legislature directed the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) to come up with a plan that provides quality care and controls costs for the future. DHHS has created a draft plan outline for the next several years that addresses the physical health care and behavioral health care for NC Medicaid recipients.

You can read more about the proposal here. The plan will be submitted to the federal government for approval.

For those concerned about the Innovations waiver, this plan continues administration of those services through our current LME/MCO system for the next four years. Please check this page for updates concerning the Innovations waiver. DHHS also included a recent press release that proposes the consolidation of the LME/MCOs to create four (out of the current eight) over the next few years.

DHHS would like NC residents to give input during public comment sessions or online. The public comment sessions begin March 30 in Raleigh. Please see below for the dates and locations. Comments are accepted until April 18th, 2016.

In addition to the DHHS page, the NC SEG (Stakeholder Engagement Group) will hold webinars for further education about how these proposed changes may affect NC citizens with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disability, mental health, or SU needs.

 

Public Comment Sessions:

March 30, 2016
McKimmon Center
Room 6
1101 Gorman Street
Raleigh, NC 27606
6-8 p.m.

March 31, 2016
Union County Dept. of Social Services
Auditorium
1212 W. Roosevelt Boulevard
Monroe, NC 28110
2-4 p.m.

You also may listen and comment by phone during the March 31 session, 2-4 p.m.
No registration is necessary.
Dial 1-888-585-9008 and, when asked, enter conference room number 780073319#
When asked, state your name.
To make a comment, press *9 on your phone. The moderator will tell you when it is your turn to make a comment.

March 31, 2016
Central Piedmont Community College, Merancas Campus
Auditorium
11930 Verhoeff Drive
Huntersville, NC 28078
6:30-8:30 p.m.

April 5, 2016
Southwestern Community College
Auditorium
447 College Drive
Sylva, NC 28779
4-6 p.m.

April 6, 2016
Holiday Inn Express
1943 Blowing Rock Road
Boone, NC 28607
12-2 p.m.

April 6, 2016
Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College
Mission Health / A-B Tech Conference Center
340 Victoria Road
Asheville, NC 28801
6:30-8:30 p.m.

April 7, 2016
Guilford County Health & Human Services
1203 Maple Street
Greensboro, NC 27405
6:30-8:30 p.m.

April 8, 2016
Forsyth County Department of Public Health
Meeting Room 1 & 2
799 North Highland Avenue
Winston-Salem, NC 27102
2-4 p.m.

April 13, 2016
University of North Carolina-Wilmington
McNeill Hall Lecture Hall
601 S. College Road
Wilmington, NC 28403
6-8 p.m.

April 14, 2016
Greenville Convention Center
Emerald Ballroom
303 SW Greenville Boulevard
Greenville, NC 27834
2-4 p.m.

April 16, 2016
College of The Albemarle
AE 208
1208 N. Road Street
Elizabeth City, NC 27909
10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

April 18, 2016
UNC-Pembroke
Moore Hall Auditorium
1 University Drive
Pembroke, NC 28372-1510
3:30-5:30 p.m.

Learn About Innovations Waiver Changes, Share Opinions on IDD Issues

Medicaid Diversion

UPDATE: The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services has notified us that the changes to the Innovations waiver are now proposed to go into effect November 1 to allow for additional training and preparation, and to provide additional time for approval of the changes by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and local LME/MCOs will hold a series of listening sessions on the Innovations Waiver and other issues related to intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) during the next few months. Staff from the state and local LME/MCOs will also be there to listen to needs, concerns, and thoughts around system reform, issues with health care, services, employment, housing, crisis, or other topics facing individuals, families and others who care about individuals with autism and other IDD.

Staff will also highlight some of the upcoming changes to the Innovations Waiver, set to take place this spring. To read a previous ASNC blog post about the upcoming waiver changes, click here. An overview of the Innovations waiver and updates are found on the Innovations landing page.

 

IDD Innovations Listening Sessions

February 2, 5:30-8 p.m.

Western Carolina University Biltmore Campus

28 Schenck Parkway, Room 346

Asheville, NC 28803

 

February 3, 5:30-8 p.m.

Partners Behavioral Healthcare

1985 Tate Blvd., SE

Hickory, NC 28602

 

February 4, 5:30-8 p.m.

Cardinal Innovations

4855 Milestone Ave.

Kannapolis, NC 28081

 

February 16, 5:30-8 p.m.

Beaufort County Ag Center

155-A Airport Road

Washington, NC 27889

 

February 17, 5:30-8 p.m.

Eastpointe

514 E. Main St.

Beulaville, NC28518

 

February 18, 5:30-8 p.m.

Trillium Health Resources

3809 Shipyard Blvd.

Wilmington, NC 28403

 

March 1, 5:30-8 p.m.

CenterPoint Human Services

4035 University Parkway

Winston Salem, NC 27106

 

March 2, 5:30-8 p.m.

FirstHealth Conference Center

Monroe Auditorium

9305 NC Hwy 211

Pinehurst, NC 28374

 

March 3, 5:30-8 p.m.

Creedmoor Baptist Church

6001 Creedmoor Road

Raleigh, NC 27612