Public Policy Update

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This article was contributed by Jennifer Mahan, Director of Advocacy and Public Policy.

 

Federal News

American Health Care Act (AHCA) Update

Thank you for calling your US House of Representatives member regarding cuts to Medicaid in the AHCA and the importance of health-care coverage for autism. Your direct advocacy matters! The US House was not able to get enough votes to support the proposed replacement for the Affordable Care Act (ACA). For now, the legislation has been shelved; however, Congress and the Trump administration continue to discuss new proposals around both an ACA replacement and Medicaid funding changes. The Autism Society of North Carolina will continue to monitor federal policy changes. We encourage you to read up on federal proposals; we will be posting occasional updates, alerts, and links to resources about health-care proposals. For more information, read the Kaiser Family Foundation policy analysis comparing AHCA, ACA, and other proposals.

Medicaid is a program that serves millions of people with disabilities and complex health conditions, including people on the autism spectrum. Medicaid Home and Community Based waivers, such as North Carolina’s Innovations and CAP programs, allow people with serious disabilities to live at home with families or in community settings. If you are not already aware of how Medicaid supports people, we urge you to begin reading up on program. ASNC will be posting occasional resources and links to learn more about Medicaid in NC and across the country.

 

Supreme Court Decision about Special Education

The Supreme Court sided with parents who removed their son from school because of an inadequate IEP. In the Court’s ruling, it said that the “appropriate” portion of the “free and appropriate education” guaranteed by IDEA, should be more than just ensuring that children make barely above minimum progress. This appears to indicate legal support for higher standards for IEPs and student advancement: that students with disabilities should be making “meaningful” progress in their education.

What is not clear from the ruling is how schools will help students achieve this progress when IDEA has never been fully funded at the federal level as was promised when the bill passed. Schools are under pressure to serve more special education students with limited resources and a shortage of special education teachers. The Autism Society continues to advocate and the state and federal levels for special-education funding and education programs that address the unique needs of students on the autism spectrum. To learn more, read the National Disability Rights Network statement on the ruling.

 

North Carolina and NC General Assembly News

NC ABLE Update

The NC Department of the State Treasurer has just announced that checking and debit options for NC ABLE accounts are now available. NC ABLE allows people to save money to pay for future or current expenses without losing eligibility for certain government benefit programs.

Signing up for NC ABLE accounts is quick and easy. For more information about how NC ABLE might benefit you or someone you know, see the FAQs.

State Budget

The governor has release his budget proposal outlining priorities for the new administration. The release of this budget also is the start of the legislative budget process for North Carolina. The sovernor’s budget proposal has a number of funding recommendations that could help those on the autism spectrum. Details are below, but include proposals to fund education support, adult guardianship, special assistance, early child development agencies, community-based MH/DD /SA services, complex children’s services, Medicaid services, and Innovations waiver slots.

The NC Senate will start the General Assembly budget process this year by introducing their version of the budget legislation. The General Assembly budget bills are not required to be based on the governor’s proposals. House and Senate leaders are said to be working closely on their proposals, and we expect to see details in the next few weeks.

ACTION: This is a great time to introduce yourself to your state senator and ask North Carolina’s General Assembly to fund much-needed services for autism.

1) If you don’t yet know which state senator represents you, check the second (middle) map on this webpage.

2) Click the link to connect with the district page and find the senator’s email or mailing address. Most are firstname.lastname@ncleg.net, and the address is listed above their email.

3) Write a short, friendly email or handwritten note:

  • Introduce yourself and mention you live and/or work in their district
  • Tell them how you are connected to autism (family, self-advocate, work with, etc.)
  • Ask them, politely, to fund one or more of the governor’s proposals and explain in a sentence or two how that will help someone with autism. For example: “We will be waiting for 7 or more years for services unless Innovations waiver slots are funded.”

This is just one example of what to write; use one that best fits your situation. For more help on advocating, see our tips or our Advocacy 101 toolkit. If you need help figuring out what to say in your email, please contact Jennifer Mahan, our Director of Advocacy and Public Policy, at jmahan@autismsociety-nc.org.

 

Governor’s Budget Proposal Details

Education

  • More School-Based Personnel to Improve Student Outcomes. Establishes a new allotment to be allocated to LEAs based on average daily membership (ADM). Provides $20 million from lottery receipts as flexible funding for LEAs to hire additional school-based personnel who will have a direct impact on improving student outcomes, including assistant principals, nurses, behavioral support staff, teaching assistants, and other instructional support personnel.

Health and Human Services

  • Adult Protective Services/Guardianship. Provides$4.6 million for 2017-18 and 2018-19. Improves the safety of adults who are elderly or disabled and who are subject to abuse, neglect, and exploitation. County Departments of Social Services receive thousands of reports annually and must evaluate and, when needed, provide adult protective services (APS). Additional funding will provide aid to counties to hire social workers needed to reduce APS caseloads and thereby increase quality of service. In addition, there is an increasing need for public legal guardians, who are required when an adult is deemed by the courts to be incapable/incompetent. Funds are provided to increase capacity to provide guardians through local entities.
  • State County Special Assistance. Provides a cash supplement to help low-income, elderly, or disabled individuals remain in their homes or live in licensed adult care homes through the State County Special Assistance program. This program is shared at a 50% participation rate between the state and county. Increased funding is needed to ensure this living assistance benefit is available based upon anticipated enrollment and payments.
  • Invests in Children’s Development Services Agencies. Supports children and families by investing in the Children’s Developmental Services Agencies (CDSA). The 16 regional CDSAs, which serve children who have developmental disabilities and are ages 0-3, require additional staff to comply with federal mandates. Current staff maintain high caseloads that impede their ability to complete evaluations and assessments and initiate services within the required timelines. The request would fund clinical personnel and service coordinators. ($2,541,482R FY17-18 $6,397,430R FY 18-19)

MH/DD/SAS

  • Targeted Reinvestment of Community Services Funding. The base budget increases community services funding by $152.8 million on a recurring basis. Of these funds, $105.8 million in FY 2017-18 and $83.4 million in FY 2018-19 will be allocated to the Local Management Entities/Managed Care Organizations (LEM/MCOs) to meet the service needs of their catchment areas. The remaining balances, $47.0 million in FY 2017-18 and $69.4 million in FY 2018-19, will remain in the community service system, but targeted re-investments to address emerging service needs including those for dually diagnosed children (I/DD and MI), and local in-patient bed capacity. Other targeted investments include support for Innovation waiver slots and housing and supported employment pursuant to the settlement with the US Department of Justice.
  • Disability Rights of North Carolina Settlement – Specialty Treatment and Assessments.

Funds the department’s settlement agreement with Disability Rights NC. The agreement will build system capacity to better serve children with a dual diagnosis of intellectual/ developmentally disabled (I/DD) and behavioral health needs. The request will fund comprehensive assessments and services, to include home health care, rehabilitative and personal care services, and an outpatient clinic at the Murdoch Center. (This is funded through the targeted reinvestment of community services funding in the base budget.)

Medicaid

  • Medicaid Rebase. Provides funds for changes to enrollment, utilization, costs, rates, and services associated with the Medicaid program. This recommendation reflects the amount of change from the base budget to fund the current Medicaid program in the upcoming biennium. This would include funds to address autism behavior services under Early Periodic Screen Diagnosis and Treatment requirements (EPSDT).
  • Expand DD Innovation Waiver Slots. Provides funds for changes to enrollment, utilization, costs, rates, and services associated with the Medicaid program. This recommendation reflects the amount of change from the base budget to fund the current Medicaid program in the upcoming biennium.
  • Extend DD Innovation Waiver Slots to Lower-Acuity Individuals. Fully funds an additional 1,000 NC Innovations waiver slots, effective January 1, 2018, for individuals that do not need the full range or intensity of services offered under the current waiver, but who will benefit from service at their specific level of need. (This is funded through the targeted reinvestment of community services funding in the base budget.)

The Senate and House are coordinating on the development of NC’s two-year budget, set to roll out in the coming weeks.

If you have questions about policy issues, please contact Jennifer Mahan, ASNC Director of Advocacy and Public Policy, at jmahan@autismsociety-nc.org or 919-865-5068.

Join Our Campaign for Acceptance

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Join us this April as we again focus on acceptance and inclusion, not just awareness, for National Autism Awareness Month. The #A2AforAutism campaign to move communities from Awareness “2” Acceptance, started some conversations last year, and we can’t wait to see how it builds this year.

We want people with autism, and their families, to feel welcomed in their communities. We want people to know about autism’s challenges, so they can be more accommodating. But we also want them to know how their lives can be better when they include people with autism.

How can you help share this message and move your communities from Awareness “2” Acceptance? Here are some ideas:

  • Use the hashtag #A2AforAutismeverywhere: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest!
    • Share photos of autism awareness events that you attend.
    • Share pics or videos of your child with autism playing with neighborhood friends. Or, if you have a neurotypical child, them with their friends with autism. (Remember to get parents’ permission for sharing on social media.)
    • Share photos, videos, or stories of your loved ones with autism that show off their unique talents.
    • Share stories of inclusion.
    • Always remember the #A2AforAutism, so we can share your images, too.
  • Share ASNC’s social media posts throughout the month.
  • Join us for World Autism Awareness and Acceptance Day on Sunday, April 2, at Camp Royall near Pittsboro.
  • Wear the #A2AforAutism T-shirt as often as you can wash it. (Don’t have one? Buy one from the ASNC Bookstore)
  • Put an #A2AforAutism magneton your vehicle (Also available from the Bookstore)
  • Tell teachers, club leaders, faith communities, etc., about our online materials that can help them create acceptance in their communities. The free resources include videos, informational items, ideas for crafts and fundraisers, and more.
  • Ask to provide a presentation or displayon acceptance in your clubs, schools, faith communities, etc. You can find ideas on our website or the ASNC Communications Department can help you with materials.

Imagine what acceptance could do for our loved ones with autism. We thank you for your efforts throughout April!

 

Action Alert: Ask Representatives to Stop Medicaid Cuts

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Action Alert: Proposed Changes to Medicaid Will Cut Funding

Call Your Representatives Today!

 

Congress is moving quickly to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA or Obamacare) and replace it with the American Health Care Act, or AHCA. This bill will make drastic cuts to the Medicaid program affecting people with autism who are currently getting Medicaid, including those on Innovations home and community based waiver, those on the waiting list, and those who may need these services in the future.

The health-care bill is being debated now. The House of Representatives is moving quickly to push for a vote by the end of March. The Senate is planning to vote on the House bill before the mid-April recess.

We urgently need you to call your senators and representatives today and explain why the ACA and Medicaid are essential to people with disabilities and their families. People’s health, services, and lives are at stake.

Message: Do not cut and cap Medicaid. As it is currently written, the AHCA will cut an estimated $800 billion from Medicaid over the next 10 years.

  • Already lengthy waiting lists for disability waiver services will grow to record levels, and services may be severely limited. General Assembly legislators are moving to reduce NC waiting lists; these changes at the federal level could stop this from happening
  • If funds become scarcer, states may decide to stop providing personal care, mental health, prescription drugs, and rehabilitative services.
  • People with disabilities who require Medicaid services to live in their own homes, hold jobs, and participate in communities may be without those supports. Costs could shift to individuals or family members.
  • Coverage for intensive behavior services (including ABA) for children under Medicaid’s EPSDT could end.
  • Schools may no longer be reimbursed for services. This would only increase the burden on schools.
  • For additional information, see the Medicaid fact sheet developed by the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities.

Take 5 minutes to call your representatives now!

Let them know:

  • I am your constituent.
  • I am a person with a disability, or I am a family member of someone with a disability, or I am a professional in the disability field.
  • I care deeply about health care, including Medicaid.
  • Briefly share your personal story; that is what will make a difference.
  • North Carolina is already using per-capita funding models and has 8-year waiting lists for many autism services.
  • Do not allow per-capita caps and cuts to Medicaid to be part of an ACA replacement.

Call now:

Sen. Richard Burr 202-224-3154

Sen. Thom Tillis 202-224-6342

NC congressional delegation (find which US House member represents you here):

  • 1st District: George “G.K.” Butterfield Jr. 202-225-3101
  • 2nd District: George Holding 202-225-3032
  • 3rd District: Walter Jones Jr. 202-225-3415
  • 4th District: David Price 202-225-1784
  • 5th District: Virginia Foxx 202-225-2071
  • 6th District: Mark Walker 202-225-3065
  • 7th District: David Rouzer 202-225-2731
  • 8th District: Richard Hudson 202-225-3715
  • 9th District: Robert Pittenger 202-225-1976
  • 10th District: Patrick McHenry 202-225-2576
  • 11th District: Mark Meadows 202-225-6401
  • 12th District: Alma Adams 202-225-1510
  • 13th District: Tedd Budd 202-225-4531

 

To learn more about how to advocate with your legislators, see our website.

Every call you make counts! Literally. Staff and representatives are noting the issues and counting calls.

Thank you for taking action and making calls today!

 

Craven County Chapter Leader Recognized

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Kim Hoffman has selflessly given hours and hours of service as the Leader of the ASNC Craven County Chapter since January 2015. With the help of other dedicated volunteers, she has touched so many lives through the Chapter, organizing dozens of educational events, social activities, and awareness efforts in her community. Kim’s passion and energy never cease to amaze us at ASNC!

We are not the only ones who notice her dedication. On March 2, Kim was honored at the “I Love That Lady” gala in New Bern. She was among seven women who were named finalists after being nominated by members of their community. Kim was one of the runner-ups and won $1,000 for the Craven County Chapter.

“It was well-deserved recognition for Kim and all the work she has done in Craven County to bring awareness to the community and help for the parents and families in the area,” said Terry Fetzer, Regional Chapter Coordinator. “The room was packed with wonderful ladies, and this was really a special highlight.”

Kim Hoffman awardKim said it truly was a wonderful evening. “I could not stop smiling,” she said. “Just to be honored … and to get this kind of recognition never crossed my mind. I am honored and blessed to serve this chapter 100 percent.”

The Chapter has big plans for its award money. “We will continue to keep our chapter busy with workshops and sensory-friendly events,” Kim said. “We will continue to be a support system for our families and a resource for them so they don’t feel alone. We are always encouraging new things for our kids to push them with their parents help and expose them to new life experiences they never thought were possible.”

Kim’s son Maxwell, who was diagnosed with autism when he was 4, is 11 now and “doing fantastic,” she said. “He is my colorful gift from God.”

“I know I’m the Chapter leader, but this Chapter is for me as well. I can only share my experiences with other parents in hopes that they know that with the right resources, our kids are brilliant and smart. I would never change a thing about this Chapter.”

 

For information on how you can become involved with one of our 50+ Chapters around the state, click here. No chapter in your area? ASNC works with local families to start new groups. Contact Marty Kellogg at mkellogg@autismsociety-nc.org for more information.

ASNC Day on the Hill

 

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This article was contributed by Jennifer Mahan, Director of Advocacy and Public Policy.

The Autism Society of North Carolina traveled to Washington, D.C., to participate in the Autism Society of America’s annual Day on the Hill for Autism Society advocates. Our goal in participating this year was to make sure that we voiced to Congress the critical need for services and supports for people of all ages on the autism spectrum, as legislators consider affordable health care access, Medicaid funding, and education issues.

ASNC Director of Policy Jennifer Mahan met with staff from our congressional delegation on Capitol Hill February 16 to discuss our concerns about affordable, comprehensive health care; Medicaid’s importance to people with disabling conditions; the need for adult services including employment supports and housing; and the right to a free appropriate education that meets the needs of students with disabilities.

Many of our current members of Congress are aware of autism issues, as well as the work of ASNC, based on their connections to constituents, families and ASNC’s long history of service in NC. Despite this familiarity, with so many changes happening on a national level it is more important than ever for all of us to make the connection between the policy decisions faced by our members of Congress and the impact of those decisions on the lives of people with autism and their families.

 

What You Can Do

  1. Learn who represents you and North Carolina in Congress.
    • You are represented by two US senators, Richard Burr and Thom Tillis.
    • You are represented by one member of the US House of Representatives, based on where you live. You can find out which US House member represents you by entering your street address on the THIRD map at the bottom of this page. (Please note that only the third map on this page is for Congress. The other maps are for the NC General Assembly.) Or you can call the Congressional Switchboard at 202-224-312 for info on your members of Congress.
  2. Tell your representatives about your experiences with autism, as a person on the spectrum, as a family member, as a professional, as someone who cares:
    • Call or email. Handwritten letters take weeks or months to reach Congress because of security measures. Calling or emailing is better. Better still is inviting your member of Congress to a local autism event or local service organization to see things firsthand.
    • Say you live in their district. (OR for your two senators, say that you live in NC).
    • Tell them the basics: who you are, how autism has affected you, why the issue is important, and why retaining or getting access to health care and education services has helped. Keep it to the equivalent of a page or a five-minute conversation. Short summaries are more likely to generate questions and interest in your issue.
    • Be respectful and positive, but firm. Ask for what you need. Some talking points are below. See our toolkit Advocacy 101 for more on working with elected officials.

 

Talking Points to Advocate on Issues that Matter

We know that health and disability issues can be complex. Below are some points that you can use in your discussions with Congress. MOST IMPORTANT is telling your story about autism and what is working or what could be improved with the help of your member of Congress. You don’t need to be a policy expert!

  1. The Affordable Care Act/“Obamacare”
    • The ACA should not be repealed without a plan for replacement that maintains or improves access to health care.
    • People with autism have benefited from parts of the ACA that require coverage for pre-existing conditions, the ability to stay on families’ health-care insurance until the age of 26, and the ability to buy affordable coverage on the health marketplace.
    • Autism is a complex disorder that often includes other physical and neurological conditions.
    • Any health-care package must include both rehabilitative AND habilitative services, mental health and addiction services coverage, behavior treatment, and prescription drug coverage.
    • Because of changes in the ACA, North Carolina has dramatically improved access to children’s health care, which improves access to developmental screening, early identification of autism, and early interventions.
    • Health care must be affordable and address high cost-sharing requirements and high premiums. Many families already struggle with added costs of raising a child with special health needs. Many adults on the spectrum are unemployed or under-employed, so age cannot be the only factor in determining health-care subsidies.
  2. Medicaid
    • Medicaid provides health-care services, long-term care services, and other supports that maintain health, functioning independence, safety and well-being to an estimated 500,000 children and adults with disabilities in North Carolina.
    • State Medicaid programs provide critical screening, early intervention, and home-based health programs for children with autism under Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT). Early screening, diagnosis, and intervention are critical to preventing long-term disability.
    • NC is already doing a good job with its federal Medicaid funds: NC has used managed-care principles, prevention services, and health data to effectively manage Medicaid costs.
    • Do not cut Medicaid funding. Program cuts, along with block granting or per capita caps would hurt people with autism who rely on Medicaid for essential services. These costs get passed along to beneficiaries, families, and providers who are already doing more with less.
    • Additional cuts or restrictions on Medicaid funding could prevent NC from addressing the 12,000 people with developmental disabilities, including autism, on NC’s Medicaid waiver waiting list.
  3. Education
    • The Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) and the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) ensure that students with disabilities get the education they need and that schools are subject to a strong accountability system to ensure all students succeed.
    • IDEA is parent-driven: parents ask for evaluations, participate in planning, and can access procedural protections to ensure that their child is able to learn.
    • The federal IDEA act is not perfect, but it is assuring families that their child is able to attend school and get access to the curriculum in the least restrictive environment. It is CRITICALLY important to assure these rights for students with disabilities.
    • Schools are already challenged to meet the needs of students with disabilities: right now only about 15% of the funding for educating special needs students comes from the federal government though much more was promised. Please fully fund special education.

 

If you have questions about policy issues, please contact Jennifer Mahan, ASNC Director of Advocacy and Public Policy, at jmahan@autismsociety-nc.org or 919-865-5068.

 

 

 

ABLE Accounts Coming in Early 2017

This article was contributed by Jennifer Mahan, Director of Advocacy and Public Policy.

Individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have been eagerly anticipating the availability of ABLE savings accounts, which allow a person with a disability to save for critical expenses while still allowing eligibility for means-tested disability supports and health care. North Carolina has looked at the options and resources available to operate an ABLE account program and has determined that the best approach is to join a consortium of other states to keep costs lower and still provide good value and customer service for account-holders.

Under this consortium of states, ABLE accounts should start to become available in early 2017, according to information presented to advocates from the ABLE Board of Trustees and the NC Department of the State Treasurer. This statement presented at the last NC ABLE Board of Trustees meeting outlines the board’s decision to participate in the 11-state group. You can learn more about ABLE accounts and sign up for information at the NC Department of the State Treasurer.

With recent changes to federal law, you are no longer required to open an account in the state where the individual with the disability resides; you can open an account in any state that offers them! The Arc of the US is tracking ABLE implementation and which states are operating accounts; see the results here. Please note that some states may be offering accounts only to state residents, an individual can have only one account at a time, and fees may apply for accounts to be rolled over into new accounts should you want to move them to another state later.

 

Background

In August of 2015, legislation authorizing ABLE accounts passed the General Assembly and was signed into law by the governor. The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, a federal law signed in December 2014, will give many individuals with disabilities, including those on the autism spectrum, and their families the opportunity to save for the future and fund essential expenses such as medical and dental care, education, community-based supports, employment training, assistive technology, housing, and transportation. The law allows eligible individuals with disabilities to create “ABLE accounts” that resemble the qualified tuition programs, often called “529 accounts,” that have been established under that section of the tax code since 1996.

By saving for and funding critical daily expenses, ABLE accounts will give North Carolinians with disabilities increased choice, independence, and opportunities to participate more fully within their communities. Without these accounts, people with disabilities have very limited ways to save, and any savings may prevent them from accessing other needed programs and services.

Key Characteristics of ABLE Accounts

  • An eligible individual may have one ABLE account, which can be established in any state that offers ABLE accounts.
  • Any person, such as a family member, friend, or the person with a disability, may contribute to an ABLE account for an eligible beneficiary.
  • An ABLE account may not receive annual contributions exceeding the annual gift-tax exemption ($14,000 in 2016). A state must also ensure that aggregate contributions to an ABLE account do not exceed the state-based limits for 529 accounts.
  • ABLE accounts are investment savings accounts and monthly fees are typically charged for account management. Compare fees and services across states before choosing where to open an ABLE account.
  • An eligible individual is a person (1) who is entitled to benefits on the basis of disability or blindness under the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program or under the Social Security disability, retirement, and survivors program OR (2) who submits certification that meets the criteria for a disability certification (to be further defined in regulations). An eligible individual’s disability must have occurred before the age 26.
  • Qualified disability expenses are any expenses made for the benefit of the designated beneficiary and related to his/her disability, including: education, housing, transportation, employment training and support, assistive technology and personal support services, health, prevention and wellness, financial management and administrative services, legal fees, expenses for oversight and monitoring, funeral and burial expenses, and other expenses, which are approved by the Secretary of the Treasury under regulations.
  • Tax treatment: Earnings on an ABLE account and distributions from the account for qualified disability expenses do not count as taxable income of the contributor or the eligible beneficiary for purposes of federal tax returns. Contributions to an ABLE account must be made in cash from the contributors’ after-tax income.
  • Rollovers: Assets in an ABLE account may be rolled over without penalty into another ABLE account for either the designated beneficiary (such as when moving to another state) or any beneficiary’s qualifying family members. At this time, college savings 529 accounts cannot be rolled over into ABLE accounts.

 

Federal Treatment of ABLE Account under Means-Tested Programs, Including Supplemental Security Income and Medicaid

  • Means-Tested Programs: Assets in an ABLE account and distributions from the account for qualified disability expenses would be disregarded when determining the designated beneficiary’s eligibility for most federal means-tested benefits.
  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI): For SSI, only the first $100,000 in an ABLE account will be disregarded. Assets above $100,000 will count as resources under SSI. If the designated beneficiary’s ABLE account balance exceeds $100,000, the individual’s SSI benefits will not be terminated, but instead suspended until the individual’s resources fall below $100,000. It is intended that distributions expended for housing will receive the same treatment as all housing costs paid by outside sources.
  • Medicaid Eligibility: A beneficiary will not lose eligibility for Medicaid based on the assets held in an ABLE account, even during the time that SSI benefits are suspended (as described above for an account over $100,000).
  • Medicaid Payback Provision: Subject to certain limits and upon a state’s filing of a claim for payment, any assets remaining in an ABLE account upon the death of the qualified beneficiary must be used to reimburse the state for Medicaid payments it made on behalf of the beneficiary. The amount of Medicaid payback is calculated based on amounts paid by the beneficiary as premiums to a Medicaid buy-in program.

 

The Autism Society of North Carolina has supported the development of ABLE accounts, which will be another tool that families and individuals can use to create opportunities to enhance their lives. We will provide information to the public about how to access them as it becomes available. Please check the ASNC blog, website, and social media outlets for updated information and other helpful resources.

If you have questions about this or other public policy issues, please contact Jennifer Mahan, Director of Advocacy and Public Policy at ASNC, at jmahan@autismsociety-nc.org or 919-865-5068.