Action Alert: Ask Representatives to Stop Medicaid Cuts

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Action Alert: Proposed Changes to Medicaid Will Cut Funding

Call Your Representatives Today!

 

Congress is moving quickly to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA or Obamacare) and replace it with the American Health Care Act, or AHCA. This bill will make drastic cuts to the Medicaid program affecting people with autism who are currently getting Medicaid, including those on Innovations home and community based waiver, those on the waiting list, and those who may need these services in the future.

The health-care bill is being debated now. The House of Representatives is moving quickly to push for a vote by the end of March. The Senate is planning to vote on the House bill before the mid-April recess.

We urgently need you to call your senators and representatives today and explain why the ACA and Medicaid are essential to people with disabilities and their families. People’s health, services, and lives are at stake.

Message: Do not cut and cap Medicaid. As it is currently written, the AHCA will cut an estimated $800 billion from Medicaid over the next 10 years.

  • Already lengthy waiting lists for disability waiver services will grow to record levels, and services may be severely limited. General Assembly legislators are moving to reduce NC waiting lists; these changes at the federal level could stop this from happening
  • If funds become scarcer, states may decide to stop providing personal care, mental health, prescription drugs, and rehabilitative services.
  • People with disabilities who require Medicaid services to live in their own homes, hold jobs, and participate in communities may be without those supports. Costs could shift to individuals or family members.
  • Coverage for intensive behavior services (including ABA) for children under Medicaid’s EPSDT could end.
  • Schools may no longer be reimbursed for services. This would only increase the burden on schools.
  • For additional information, see the Medicaid fact sheet developed by the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities.

Take 5 minutes to call your representatives now!

Let them know:

  • I am your constituent.
  • I am a person with a disability, or I am a family member of someone with a disability, or I am a professional in the disability field.
  • I care deeply about health care, including Medicaid.
  • Briefly share your personal story; that is what will make a difference.
  • North Carolina is already using per-capita funding models and has 8-year waiting lists for many autism services.
  • Do not allow per-capita caps and cuts to Medicaid to be part of an ACA replacement.

Call now:

Sen. Richard Burr 202-224-3154

Sen. Thom Tillis 202-224-6342

NC congressional delegation (find which US House member represents you here):

  • 1st District: George “G.K.” Butterfield Jr. 202-225-3101
  • 2nd District: George Holding 202-225-3032
  • 3rd District: Walter Jones Jr. 202-225-3415
  • 4th District: David Price 202-225-1784
  • 5th District: Virginia Foxx 202-225-2071
  • 6th District: Mark Walker 202-225-3065
  • 7th District: David Rouzer 202-225-2731
  • 8th District: Richard Hudson 202-225-3715
  • 9th District: Robert Pittenger 202-225-1976
  • 10th District: Patrick McHenry 202-225-2576
  • 11th District: Mark Meadows 202-225-6401
  • 12th District: Alma Adams 202-225-1510
  • 13th District: Tedd Budd 202-225-4531

 

To learn more about how to advocate with your legislators, see our website.

Every call you make counts! Literally. Staff and representatives are noting the issues and counting calls.

Thank you for taking action and making calls today!

 

ASNC Day on the Hill

 

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This article was contributed by Jennifer Mahan, Director of Advocacy and Public Policy.

The Autism Society of North Carolina traveled to Washington, D.C., to participate in the Autism Society of America’s annual Day on the Hill for Autism Society advocates. Our goal in participating this year was to make sure that we voiced to Congress the critical need for services and supports for people of all ages on the autism spectrum, as legislators consider affordable health care access, Medicaid funding, and education issues.

ASNC Director of Policy Jennifer Mahan met with staff from our congressional delegation on Capitol Hill February 16 to discuss our concerns about affordable, comprehensive health care; Medicaid’s importance to people with disabling conditions; the need for adult services including employment supports and housing; and the right to a free appropriate education that meets the needs of students with disabilities.

Many of our current members of Congress are aware of autism issues, as well as the work of ASNC, based on their connections to constituents, families and ASNC’s long history of service in NC. Despite this familiarity, with so many changes happening on a national level it is more important than ever for all of us to make the connection between the policy decisions faced by our members of Congress and the impact of those decisions on the lives of people with autism and their families.

 

What You Can Do

  1. Learn who represents you and North Carolina in Congress.
    • You are represented by two US senators, Richard Burr and Thom Tillis.
    • You are represented by one member of the US House of Representatives, based on where you live. You can find out which US House member represents you by entering your street address on the THIRD map at the bottom of this page. (Please note that only the third map on this page is for Congress. The other maps are for the NC General Assembly.) Or you can call the Congressional Switchboard at 202-224-312 for info on your members of Congress.
  2. Tell your representatives about your experiences with autism, as a person on the spectrum, as a family member, as a professional, as someone who cares:
    • Call or email. Handwritten letters take weeks or months to reach Congress because of security measures. Calling or emailing is better. Better still is inviting your member of Congress to a local autism event or local service organization to see things firsthand.
    • Say you live in their district. (OR for your two senators, say that you live in NC).
    • Tell them the basics: who you are, how autism has affected you, why the issue is important, and why retaining or getting access to health care and education services has helped. Keep it to the equivalent of a page or a five-minute conversation. Short summaries are more likely to generate questions and interest in your issue.
    • Be respectful and positive, but firm. Ask for what you need. Some talking points are below. See our toolkit Advocacy 101 for more on working with elected officials.

 

Talking Points to Advocate on Issues that Matter

We know that health and disability issues can be complex. Below are some points that you can use in your discussions with Congress. MOST IMPORTANT is telling your story about autism and what is working or what could be improved with the help of your member of Congress. You don’t need to be a policy expert!

  1. The Affordable Care Act/“Obamacare”
    • The ACA should not be repealed without a plan for replacement that maintains or improves access to health care.
    • People with autism have benefited from parts of the ACA that require coverage for pre-existing conditions, the ability to stay on families’ health-care insurance until the age of 26, and the ability to buy affordable coverage on the health marketplace.
    • Autism is a complex disorder that often includes other physical and neurological conditions.
    • Any health-care package must include both rehabilitative AND habilitative services, mental health and addiction services coverage, behavior treatment, and prescription drug coverage.
    • Because of changes in the ACA, North Carolina has dramatically improved access to children’s health care, which improves access to developmental screening, early identification of autism, and early interventions.
    • Health care must be affordable and address high cost-sharing requirements and high premiums. Many families already struggle with added costs of raising a child with special health needs. Many adults on the spectrum are unemployed or under-employed, so age cannot be the only factor in determining health-care subsidies.
  2. Medicaid
    • Medicaid provides health-care services, long-term care services, and other supports that maintain health, functioning independence, safety and well-being to an estimated 500,000 children and adults with disabilities in North Carolina.
    • State Medicaid programs provide critical screening, early intervention, and home-based health programs for children with autism under Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT). Early screening, diagnosis, and intervention are critical to preventing long-term disability.
    • NC is already doing a good job with its federal Medicaid funds: NC has used managed-care principles, prevention services, and health data to effectively manage Medicaid costs.
    • Do not cut Medicaid funding. Program cuts, along with block granting or per capita caps would hurt people with autism who rely on Medicaid for essential services. These costs get passed along to beneficiaries, families, and providers who are already doing more with less.
    • Additional cuts or restrictions on Medicaid funding could prevent NC from addressing the 12,000 people with developmental disabilities, including autism, on NC’s Medicaid waiver waiting list.
  3. Education
    • The Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) and the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) ensure that students with disabilities get the education they need and that schools are subject to a strong accountability system to ensure all students succeed.
    • IDEA is parent-driven: parents ask for evaluations, participate in planning, and can access procedural protections to ensure that their child is able to learn.
    • The federal IDEA act is not perfect, but it is assuring families that their child is able to attend school and get access to the curriculum in the least restrictive environment. It is CRITICALLY important to assure these rights for students with disabilities.
    • Schools are already challenged to meet the needs of students with disabilities: right now only about 15% of the funding for educating special needs students comes from the federal government though much more was promised. Please fully fund special education.

 

If you have questions about policy issues, please contact Jennifer Mahan, ASNC Director of Advocacy and Public Policy, at jmahan@autismsociety-nc.org or 919-865-5068.

 

 

 

TIPS Serves Adults with Autism

tips-167Serving others is obviously important to members of the Triangle Indian-American Physicians Society (TIPS); they are, after all, in health care. But serving outside of their chosen careers is also important to them. For years, members have volunteered their efforts and expertise at free clinics all around the Triangle and at a yearly free screening.

 

Three years ago, TIPS wanted to give back to the local community in a different way. They worked with friends and local business leaders to research charities and decided the Autism Society of North Carolina had the kind of impact they were seeking.

 

“ASNC has been the leader in helping not only families but adults with autism. Some of the success stories of adults being able to be a functioning part of our society really hits close to home,” a TIPS board statement said. “We as health-care providers are always trying to make a positive impact on patients, and we feel ASNC also is doing the same for people living with autism in our state.”

 

Several TIPS members have loved ones with autism and others frequently work closely with patients with autism as in their health-care practices. In addition, ASNC has supported multiple adults with autism who have gained meaningful employment at one member’s local Raleigh pharmacy.

 

TIPS has held three events to benefit ASNC: two golf tournaments and a gala with live and silent auctions. These events raised close to $100,000 to benefit ASNC’s Employment Supports department, which enables adults with autism to become contributing members of society and feel a part of the communities in which they live.

 

The events also brought in hundreds of attendees, raising awareness of autism in the community, a success that the TIPS board notes is immeasurable.

 

tips-133Kristy White, Chief Development Officer, praised the dedication and time that the members of TIPS put into their events to give adults with autism full and meaningful lives. “I think it is so remarkable what they give on a daily basis through their work, and then to do this for us in their spare time. They spend every moment making a difference in each and every life.”

 

We are grateful for the partnership of TIPS and excited to see its future!

 

The TIPS board stated, “We hope to continue to raise awareness about autism professionally as well as socially in the surrounding communities, and hope to keep hosting these great events to raise the much-needed funds to keep this program running and helping empower adults with autism.”

Chef Pepper Jack’s Food Drive

jack-food-driveWhen 17-year-old Jack Cullen began to notice people on streets holding signs requesting donations, food, or jobs, he started asking questions. He wanted to understand why they didn’t have food or jobs. He wondered whether they had homes or other belongings. The growing concern that Jack displayed led his Autism Support Professional, Holly, to ask him whether he would like to help people with these kinds of needs. Jack enthusiastically embraced the idea, and together, they began looking for ways that they could serve people whose most basic needs were unmet.

After doing their research, Jack and Holly chose to become involved with the local food bank, but it was in an old warehouse that did not have air conditioning, and the noise from the machinery was very loud. This environment presented a variety of sensory challenges that could have prevented Jack, who has Autism Spectrum Disorder, from becoming involved. But instead of allowing those barriers to limit Jack, Holly helped him find a different approach. Instead of doing work inside the food bank, after food was already collected, Jack worked with Holly on a plan for his own food drive. This allowed him to collect and sort the food in a suitable environment, before delivering it to the food bank.

Together, Holly and Jack created flyers and collection bins for the food drive. Jack named his endeavor Chef Pepper Jack’s Food Drive, based on his favorite game, Skylanders. Holly coached him on how to talk to family, friends, and community members to solicit donations. He passed out flyers and set up collection bins, and it wasn’t long before donations starting coming in! As his box filled, he sorted the donations, loaded the boxes into the car, and, with Holly’s help, took them to the food bank. Jack also sent handwritten thank-you cards to friends and family who had made donations.

So far, Jack has made three trips to the food bank, with his biggest donation weighing in at 120 pounds! Jack’s original goal was to collect 500 pounds, but when asked whether he plans to keep the food drive going, he answered, “Yes! Absolutely!”

The Autism Society of NC provides a variety of community-based services that enable individuals with ASD not only to receive the day-to-day support they need and to gain valuable skills, but also to find and engage in opportunities to become involved in their communities in a meaningful way. Jack’s story is just one example of how ASNC is committed to empowering individuals to connect with others and achieve goals that bring them personal satisfaction and purpose. Learn more here or contact us at 800-442-2762.

Managing Frustration and Anxiety

 

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Dr. Jed Baker, noted autism expert and author, shared some of his expertise with parents and professionals last week at a one-day conference in Raleigh. His presentation was titled “Managing Frustration and Anxiety and Teaching Social Skills” and provided strategies for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder, ADHD, anxiety, mood disorders, and learning challenges.

For those who could not attend, we are sharing highlights of the portion of Dr. Baker’s presentation on managing frustration and anxiety. You can also learn more with his award-winning books, available in the ASNC Bookstore at www.autismbookstore.com.

Keep Your Cool

Dr. Baker’s first tip was that caregivers must learn to control their own emotions. “If you can be cool, you can get someone else cool,” he said. Reacting to someone having a meltdown by either giving them what they want or forcing their compliance is not effective, he said. Giving in doesn’t last; it feels good in the moment but has disastrous long-term consequences. Getting angry comes from not feeling respected. Caregivers can use fear and unpredictability to scare individuals into complying, but in the long run, the individuals don’t trust you anymore, they don’t want to be in your home or class, and they will not like you, he said.

“90 percent of teaching and parenting is tolerance,” Dr. Baker said. Caregivers must tolerate their own discomfort long enough to think about what to do and not give in or get angry.

So how do caregivers control their own emotions? Number one, by having hope! Tthink of challenges as a temporary issue that can be fixed, not a character flaw. Know that things will get better eventually as long as you stick to strategies. Studies have shown that parents who are optimistic stick to strategies and therefore bad behaviors lessen over time.

Two other things to keep in mind when attempting to control your own reactions: Realize that the individual’s behavior is not intended to challenge your authority but is rather a reflection of their lack of coping skills. Also, do not worry about what other people think. Most observers understand that a child having a meltdown in public is not a reflection of your competence, and they do not blame you. You can gain respect by controlling yourself, not the child.

Lastly, be sure to take care of yourself and maintain balance in your life. What are you doing to make yourself happy? Dr. Baker suggested trying yoga, meditation, and exercise as great ways to reduce your own stress and enable yourself to maintain control of your emotions in the face of meltdowns.

Build a Positive Relationship

The first step to managing an individual’s behavior is to build a positive relationship, Dr. Baker said. It is very important for children to know that adults around them actually do care about them; show warmth and caring.

Ensure that the individuals know what is expected of them by using structure, visual supports, and differentiated instruction. Fair is giving everyone what they need, not teaching everyone at the same level, Dr. Baker explained.

You can also build confidence through the 80/20 rule. Enable individuals to succeed by starting with tasks or lessons they already grasp, then move on to new or more difficult material for the last 20 percent. If you start with the difficult material, they will feel defeated, Dr. Baker said. If you don’t let them make a mistake or fail the first eight times, they will believe they can succeed.

And finally, avoid power struggles. For example on homework, allowing breaks or limiting the amount of time they spend on it is not giving in, it is managing the work. You could also try doing the work with them or doing the first problem for them.

Manage Crises

When an argument, meltdown, or crisis does come up, first be willing to take some time to manage it. Listen to their side of the situation, agree, and apologize when necessary. Show some sympathy; there is always a kernel of truth in why they are acting out. Then collaborate and ask them “what do you want? Let’s find the right way to get that.”

If the individual is too distraught to use logic or reason, try to distract them and change their mood or focus with novel items, special interests, or sensory activities. Dr. Baker said that when he is working with individuals on the spectrum, he always keeps his pockets full of things he can use to distract them. Distraction is not rewarding the behavior as long as you don’t give them what they were having a tantrum over. If the individual is trying to avoid a task, distraction helps them avoid it, so give them a legitimate way such as taking a short break or breaking the task into pieces.

Once the crisis is over, make a plan for next time.

Work on Repeat Behavior Problems

If the individual is repeating unwanted behavior, explore why it happens. Observe and keep a journal so that you know what happened before, during, and after the behavior. The difficulty is that causes for the behavior come before the behavior, when you might not be paying attention. But with practice and time, you should be able to discover the trigger for the behavior.

Some of the typical triggers Dr. Baker listed were:

  1. Internal issues – hunger, exhaustion, illness
  2. Sensory issues – noise light, touch, overstimulation, boredom
  3. Lack of structure – not enough visual supports to give expectations
  4. Challenging or new work, feared situations
  5. Having to wait, not getting what one wants, disappointments
  6. Threats to self-esteem such as losing, mistakes, criticism
  7. Unmet wishes for attention – being ignored, wanting others to laugh

Once you have data on the trigger(s), you can develop a prevention plan. Dr. Baker mentioned his No More Meltdowns app that will help caregivers keep track of behaviors. The app allows you to upload to www.symtrend.com/nmm, which will analyze data and give you a prevention plan.

A good behavior plan will change or remove the triggers as much as possible, teach the individual skills to deal with the triggers, and reward new skills. If the individual is not already frustrated, you can also use a loss system when they do not use new skills to deal with the triggers.

Demands for Work

When an individual is frustrated by demands for work, there are several ways you can change that trigger. First, model and prompt rather than test. This goes along with the 80/20 rule mentioned previously. “Teach” them something they already know first, so they succeed. You also can give them a choice of which work they do, or use their special interests to make the work more appealing. Visual supports, such as instructions, outlines, and labels are helpful for many individuals. Finally, try reducing the length of time and using a timer so they can see how long they must keep doing the task.

To help individuals deal with demands for work, teach “trying when it’s hard,” Dr. Baker said. For some individuals, the fear of the work is the trigger, and this can be overcome with gradual exposure. Get them to try a small portion of the work. Teach them to ask to watch first or to ask for help. Tell them that they may take a break for a certain amount of time and then come back to try again. Finally, be willing to negotiate how much they do (unless you know you are working with an individual who will keep negotiating, which Dr. Baker referred to as a “congenital attorney,” much to the audience’s amusement).

Dealing with Fear

Some individuals fear situations that can just be avoided, but many must face their fears because situations cannot be avoided. Start by persuading these individuals that they must deal with their fears. Talk about their strengths and their optimistic future, and then bring up that they should deal with their fears so that the challenge is not in their way anymore. It can be a relief for them to learn that they do not have to change fundamentally, they just have to make it so that the challenge does not stand in the way of their success, Dr. Baker explained.

Then explain anxiety and true vs. false alarms. Being anxious means that the brain lies to you and makes you afraid all the time, rather than just keeping you out of true danger, he said. Help them to think like a scientist and do research on their fears. For example, if they wash their hands constantly because they are afraid of germs, they should research the likelihood of contracting a disease. Let them convince themselves through logic that their anxiety is overblown.

You can also try gradual exposure to their fear. A visual aid of a fear ladder with rungs of exposure can allow for rewards as they reach each rung.

To reduce individuals’ overall anxiety, add exercise, mindfulness meditation, and relaxation techniques. Dr. Baker recommended the resource www.fragrantheart.com. Focusing on the moment means they are not worrying, and it recharges and re-energizes, he said. The best time for many is at night, because they are less occupied, and so that’s when all the worries come out.

Finally, if anxiety is debilitating and other methods are not working, Dr. Baker said neurofeedback and medication can be useful options.

Waiting, Accepting No, Stopping Fun

Dr. Baker offered several strategies for individuals who have meltdowns because they are unable to wait, accept no for an answer, or transition away from preferred activities. A visual timer can help them understand how long they will have to wait or when they must start a new activity. A visual schedule also helps with transitions. “Prime ahead” by discussing what they will gain by waiting or accepting no, and talk about disappointments that might occur during an upcoming period.

Help them accept no by providing what they want or something else that they want at a later time. Use a reward system such as a “disappointment poster” and give them points for waiting, accepting no, and stopping fun.

Self-esteem: Mistakes, Losing, Teasing

For individuals who are upset by losing or mistakes, again the 80/20 rule is useful, Dr. Baker said. Let individuals win or succeed 80 percent of the time to build up goodwill. You also can talk ahead of time about mistakes that might occur but remind them that mistakes help us learn and grow; if you are not making mistakes, you are not trying new things or learning.

For teasing, first protect the individual as much as possible by surrounding them with supportive peers. Peer buddy programs have been shown to be a very effective method of building children up and preventing teasing. When teasing does occur, help them to check it out first to make sure they understood correctly. Perhaps it was not meant to be teasing. Teach them that when they are teased, they should calmly ask the person to stop, showing that the teaser did not get to them and does not control them. If the person does not stop, they should report the behavior.

Unmet Needs for Attention

Some individuals act out to gain attention. To change this trigger, you can schedule attention or special time for the individual so they know they will get it. In the classroom, for example, you could use a timer to count down to when they may speak with the teacher rather than calling out in class. Dr. Baker also recommended looking for appropriate outlets for the individual, such as theater or standup comedy.

Also, teach the individual about positive ways to get attention, stressing that they want to be liked, not just gain attention. Teach them about public vs. private topics, and if in a classroom or other group setting, try to get peers in on it — if the peers laugh when the student says something inappropriate, that is a reinforcement of the negative behavior. Teach the individual the “rules of comedy”: Don’t make fun of vulnerable people. Use slapstick, random thoughts, and self-deprecation.

Sensory Needs

For individuals who engage in self-stimulation such as drumming, flapping, or chewing for sensory needs, you can try to change the triggers by avoiding boredom such as waits or group activities in which they are not engaged, or by modifying frustrating work.

Skills you can teach them include alternative ways and times to self-stimulate and how to be a self-advocate for a better environment, Dr. Baker said. Individuals need to know to ask for what they need, such as less noise or more interaction. On the other hand, they need to know they have a right to the environment that works for them but can’t impose it on everyone else. If they need it quieter, they can ask people nicely, and if they don’t get it, the individual should ask to leave and take a break.

Self-Calming

Dr. Baker also discussed ways to prepare for unexpected triggers. Collaborate with the individual on ways to distract and soothe themselves in the case of upsets. Have them compile a folder of relaxation techniques. Establish safe people whom they can turn to when they need support. Teach them this self-talk: “All problems can be solved if you can wait and talk to the right person.”

Jed Baker, Ph.D. is the director of the Social Skills Training Project, an organization serving individuals with autism and social communication problems. He is on the professional advisory board of Autism Today, ASPEN, ANSWER, YAI, the Kelberman Center and several other autism organizations. In addition, Dr. Baker writes, lectures, and provides training internationally on the topic of social skills training and managing challenging behaviors; he was the keynote speaker at ASNC’s 2015 annual conference.

 

ASNC Celebrates Services Staff

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Jennifer Dixon (left) and her client

This article was contributed by Kari Johnston, ASNC Director of Services.

Each fall, the Autism Society of North Carolina has the privilege of celebrating the amazing work that our Direct Support Professionals do every day, providing crucial support and opportunities for individuals with autism. We do this in a few ways. During our celebration of Direct Support Professional Recognition Week, our regional services offices found large and small ways to thank these important people for their dedication to the people they serve, ranging from morning donuts and breakfast buffets, to a mini-carnival complete with food, activities, and game booths.

becky-buchananThis year, ASNC also was pleased to send one of our Community Skills Instructors, who was nominated by her supervisors, to a weekend at Great Wolf Lodge to participate in a Direct Support Professional Appreciation event held by the NC Alliance for Direct Support Professionals. Becky Buchanan of Asheville was selected to attend this event in recognition of her exemplary dedication to and work with those she supports. Becky and her family were treated to nationally recognized speakers, waterpark fun, and a great opportunity to network with other direct support professionals.

Finally, this marks the 10th year that we are honoring one direct support Direct Support Professional with the John and Claudia Roman Direct Service Award for outstanding commitment to individuals with autism and their families. The Roman Award, a cash award of $1,000, was endowed by Lori and Gregg Ireland to honor Christine Roman, the direct service professional who worked with their son, Vinnie. It was named for her parents, John and Claudia Roman. This year, we congratulate Jennifer Dixon of Raleigh for being named this year’s Roman Award recipient. Jennifer was nominated by the Coleman family for exhibiting dedication that “goes beyond the expectations of her role every single day” throughout the past 2½ years of supporting their daughter.

In her nomination, Cristi Coleman shared that Jennifer, who has two of her own daughters, often refers to Cristi’s daughter as her “third daughter.” She said, “We never have to worry about her safety or well-being” and described how Jennifer enables her daughter not only to achieve the goals that they have set with their daughter, but to exceed them with the support that she provides. Cristi said Jennifer regularly sets aside her own plans, without mentioning them, to give their family needed respite. She went on to say that Jennifer regularly does things for the family that are not part of her paid hours or responsibility. “For example, she booked tickets to see a play that was open for special needs individuals. She told me that she and [my daughter] were having a date that night, and my husband and I could have a free night to ourselves. That really means a lot … and was something extra she did out of her own heart.”

Jennifer puts a great deal of effort into finding opportunities in the community for both enjoyment and personal growth for Cristi’s daughter, who “looks forward to this time and enjoys the many different activities they do,” Cristi said. Jennifer ensures that she has the ability to make her own choices and “gives her a voice.”

We are thrilled to honor Jennifer and would also like to express our gratitude for the passion and commitment exhibited by each and every dedicated person that we are fortunate to have supporting individuals and families through the Autism Society of North Carolina.