About Us

This is the Autism Society of North Carolina’s (ASNC) Blog. This is a tool for sharing observations and commentary regarding current events, legislative news, bookstore and other ASNC programs, as well as events impacting the autism community. Your comments are welcome and we hope you will continue to stay up to date by reading and sharing a link to this page.

Who We Are:

With the increasing number of autism organizations, there is often confusion about how we are different. In short, our mission remains the same as it was when we were founded. For the past 40 years, the Autism Society of North Carolina has worked to address areas of need and expand services for the autism community in North Carolina.

  • Our organization works to directly improve the lives of individuals and families affected by autism. We help real people facing real challenges. We are service driven, rather than research driven.
  • We are a local organization, supporting North Carolinians affected by autism. Every dollar that we raise stays within North Carolina, helping people who live and work in our local communities.
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6 Responses

  1. Thanks so much! This describes meals at my home with my two autistic boys and I hope to find help soon now that I see there may be hope!

  2. Hi Alison ( See, I do read the blog, so there! [insert Bronx cheer] ),
    I have been a teacher of children with special needs in the Buffalo, New York Public Schools for 26 years. In that time I have had the opportunity to work with students facing various challenges. I was working on my MS in Severe and Profound Disorders. This was a new designation for those of us working in the field of Learning Disabilities because it became clear that there was a class of students that didn’t fit any of the given profiles, didn’t fit a mold, specifically those with autism.
    These students fit in a netherworld. Our credo was age appropriate no matter what the developmental obstacles. This is where I understood how difficult it was for the parents of these wonderful children. WE worked with them for 6 hours and I would notice the fatigue and frustration. In one situation we went bowling every Friday. I am pretty sure this was more for us than the children, who would follow directions: “Pick up the ball. Stand at the line. Roll the ball.” At which point, more often than not there was a loud bang as the ball was dropped straight down even as the child was walking away having followed the instructions to the letter. I understand but not in the way that parents do,
    I have the book learning and the theory and you have the life. I have children of my own and feel each small slight to them as if it were a knife in my own heart. So I now am a subscriber and look forward to learning those things the books and schools can not teach.

  3. Thank you, Kevin. Thank you, Patricia for reading and letting us know your thoughts on issues affecting families who have loved ones with autism and individuals on the autism spectrum.

    Patricia, “Nights at the Round Table” is no joke! What an incredible process for my boys…

    Kevin, your vast knowledge culled from teaching for decades is only diminished by your compassion.

  4. Hi Alison ( See, I do read the blog, so there! [insert Bronx cheer] ), I have been a teacher of children with special needs in the Buffalo, New York Public Schools for 26 years. In that time I have had the opportunity to work with students facing various challenges. I was working on my MS in Severe and Profound Disorders. This was a new designation for those of us working in the field of Learning Disabilities because it became clear that there was a class of students that didn’t fit any of the given profiles, didn’t fit a mold, specifically those with autism.These students fit in a netherworld. Our credo was age appropriate no matter what the developmental obstacles. This is where I understood how difficult it was for the parents of these wonderful children. WE worked with them for 6 hours and I would notice the fatigue and frustration. In one situation we went bowling every Friday. I am pretty sure this was more for us than the children, who would follow directions: “Pick up the ball. Stand at the line. Roll the ball.” At which point, more often than not there was a loud bang as the ball was dropped straight down even as the child was walking away having followed the instructions to the letter. I understand but not in the way that parents do,I have the book learning and the theory and you have the life. I have children of my own and feel each small slight to them as if it were a knife in my own heart. So I now am a subscriber and look forward to learning those things the books and schools can not teach.
    +1

  5. I so enjoyed the Autism seminar in Greensboro yesterday, 4-19-12. I learned so much. One thing I particularly would be interested in is any information that we homeschoolers could utilize. There are many national groups for homeschooling autistic kiddos. I was wondering who would know about support/information statewide. The local homeschool groups aren’t really autism inclusive.

    • Thanks Marcia! We’ve heard similar comments about needing more info and groups on homeschooling particular to children with autism from other parents. I will pass your comments along to our Greensboro/Guilford Chapter, as well as our Parent Advocates and staff here in the office. We do have a homeschooling workshop that gives some of the “basics” of homeschooling, but it sounds like you are looking to connect with other parents in NC, and in your area who homeschool. I’ll try to get someone to send you some information, but in the meantime, if you have not already, I encourage you to join both our ASNC “group” page on Facebook, as well as our fan page. The group page allows you to post information and questions for other parents. http://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/autismsocietyofnc/

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