2016 Legislative Wrap-Up: Other Highlights

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This article was contributed by Jennifer Mahan, Director of Advocacy and Public Policy at ASNC. It is the third of three parts wrapping up the NC General Assembly’s 2016 short session.

IDD Caucus: Establishment of a bipartisan, bicameral IDD caucus: North Carolina is the fourth state in the United States to have an officially established intellectual and/or developmental disability caucus in both the NC House and the NC Senate. A caucus is a legislative group that comes together to focus efforts on a particular issue, in this case, to research, better understand, and advocate for legislation to address the needs of people with IDD. The IDD caucus is bi-partisan, includes both House and Senate members, and has just begun to get organized and start its work; ASNC is excited by this legislative interest in IDD issues, including autism, and we look forward to working with the members in the sessions to come.

Free DMV identification for people with IDD, HB 1033: ID Card Fee Waiver/Disability passed the House and Senate and allows individuals with an intellectual and/or developmental disability to obtain free non-driver’s identification from the NC Department of Motor Vehicles beginning October 1. Individuals must present a letter from their physician stating that they have a developmental disability to obtain free identification. This ID can be used as an approved document for Voter ID requirements. (Note that under recent voter identification laws, individuals may obtain non-driver’s identification for free if they state it is “for purposes of voting.” These voter identification laws are currently under review by the courts and may or may not remain in place. The new law for free, non-driver identification cards for people with DD would remain in place regardless of what happens with voter identification laws.)

Enact Uniform Law on Adult Guardianship, H817: This law enacted in 41 other states will clarify issues around interstate jurisdiction, mobility, and transferability of guardianship and interstate recognition of guardianship orders. The bill was worked on by guardianship and advocacy organizations, and was passed and signed into law.

Military families stay on Innovations waitlist, HB 842: Establishes a virtual wait list for families in the military waiting for waiver slots. Allows families to remain on the waiver wait list when relocated outside of North Carolina for military service, as long as the family retains its North Carolina legal residence and intends to return upon completion of the military service.

Medicaid Transformation changes: North Carolina has already passed legislation that will, over the next 5-7 years, move our Medicaid system to a managed care model offering both statewide private managed care as well as regional health system managed care options. The goal is to improve health outcomes and integrate physical and behavioral health care, while controlling costs. This year, clarifying changes were made to that bill based on the 1115 demonstration waiver submitted by North Carolina to the federal government that will:

  • Remove the “Department of Health Benefits” as the single state entity in charge of Medicaid and return authority to the Department of Health and Human Services, as required by the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).
  • Make several key adjustments around who and what will be covered in the capitated (managed care) system and require NC DHHS to submit reports on the progress of the waiver to the Joint Legislative Oversight Committee on Medicaid and NC Health Choice. New groups and programs exempted from the 1115 managed care demonstration waiver include:
    • PACE
    • School services provided under an IEP, including audiology, speech therapy, physical therapy, nursing, and psychological services, performed by schools or individual contracted with LEA.
    • Children’s Developmental Services Agencies
    • Presumptive Medicaid eligible people

 

If you have questions about North Carolina policy issues, please contact Jennifer Mahan, ASNC Director of Advocacy and Public Policy at jmahan@autismsociety-nc.org or 919-865-5068.

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